360 Session: Claire Rozain, Senior User Acquisition Manager from Gameloft

Published by Richard Bond October 13, 2021
360 session: Alia Lassal, Wooga - using date for better creatives

Transcription below:

Richard:
This interview is with Claire Rozain from Gameloft and her enthusiasm is infectious. Her knowledge is incredible, and she says some brilliant ideas about how you can really use creative testing or misleading ads is a really great way of understanding. I should say, if handled correctly is a great way of understanding what the market is looking for and just making a better game with more retention on the customers. It's a fantastic interview. I hope you enjoy it. I'm Richard Bond. This is expert 360. Okay. So I'm joined today by Claire Rozain from Gameloft. Claire, would you like to introduce yourself?

Claire:
Yes, I'm, Claire Rozain I'm a Senior User Acquisition at Gameloft. In the past I worked in user acquisition and in a company doing match in dating and before in CRM and search as well. So a lot of different things.

Richard:
See, so that's quite an eclectic mix, right? So you were working at Match that was for the app, right. And the performance marketing in the UA there, and then you transitioned to gaming.

Claire:
So it was kind of both websites to drive a lot of traffic for the teams. So, yeah, definitely.

Richard:
All right. Amazing. Well, let's see what we're going to be talking about today. Okay. Fake or misleading ads. Okay. Hot topic. So let's dive straight in first things. First, Claire, in your opinion, are fake misleading ads. Are they dangerous for the industry or are they just like a tool to be leveraged

Claire:
When it's done properly I think fake ads are one of the main pillar to make your game a better game when it's just done in a way. But you know, like you just see a competitor as nuking to deal with your game and you just like take the same ad and do the same. It doesn't make sense if after, like in your game, you're not able to kind of have the same game experience and then you just affect your retention. But otherwise I think it's really great to do misleading ads. If you have a call with your project, so you have a bi-synergy to make some development on your own.

Richard:
Okay, excellent. So you're saying that this is actually something where you can actually utilize it to get more information from the market, what it's interested in.

Claire:
Like, you know, I'm like, <Itaku’s Well> are doing it a lot, they are really smart and doing it really well. I think they are the most creative in the market right now, when they are prototyping they make all of the iterations possible, camera, gameplay, game mechanic and they kind of, you know, it's kind of a, a UX studio, with user acquisition because you just benchmark the price that you have on the market. And, and you, you knew else of course, that you can sell your game at the end of the day. So to make it better. I think Itaku’s Well is really advancing it. But I think a lot of publishing companies are doing it in a way that doesn't make any sense because there is no process once again, and no methodology, I think creative strategy, something I always hear, I don't know what is a creative strategy. When now it's a kind of the core of the problem. So UA managers need to go outside of the numbers and just have pure possess for creative strategy.

Richard:
It's a really interesting way of looking at it because there's a lot of networks, right. At the moment. There's a lot of discussion about cracking down on fake ads, but like, you know, as you define, there are gray areas. How do we define a fake ads, for example, like CGI, very rarely displays, you know, it shows any gameplay, right? It's more to do with the narrative.

Claire:
Yes, totally. So I think it's definitely dangerous for some category of games. Like I used to, or even like things like gambling for instance. And so like you call to me, seeing this is your user in some categories, for instance, on dating, we had a lot of ads rejected because Facebook did the Facebook Dating, but also because it's a really sensitive to keep, to make people meet and users image of someone with their face. It's kind of, you know, it can be dangerous to be honest. And I think it's the same for when, when you are gambling, if you're doing a real money ad and then at the end of the day you are just misleading it's against the law you come to. Otherwise, if you are, Apple and you bring an ad for an iPhone and you see a guy dancing and so on, I'm sorry, but when I had an iPhone, I never danced better. Maybe that's even worse. I don't know. So, no, I didn't say it, but I mean, at the end of the day, it's our job, right? Like we are doing advertisement like what stick to them. And you make your project, according, what is speaking to the people otherwise, you just have a product that no one is going to use.

Richard:
Yeah. I think you've hit the nail on the head on something really interesting that it's not misleading, but it's creative and it's trying to suggest something. And yet obviously in the gaming world, it's a very, very different case. Are you just showing something completely separate to your game? Cause you know, that that particular creative works well or are you using it as part of the strategy? And I think you, you make a really, really interesting point there. All right. Well, let's talk about impact. You mentioned at the start about retention. So have you ever seen or experienced, or know of things where misleading ads have either led to like a brilliant increase or a huge decrease in retention or like, yes.

Claire:
Yes. So then you like to be less now, but creative get more advanced. You need to watch closely or retention, especially creative. And also, I would say like your CEO, because like, if it's a women that drug use and work closely with the ASO manager, for instance, for instance, for Christmas, if I have an ad saying, Hey, Merry Christmas, we've, I don't know some tech loss everywhere. And that's the end of the day I go on this top page and I just have nothing that is related to this. I'm just going to drop out and not install the game. And if I open the game and I don't have any, any live ops events saying to me, yeah, it's Chris Smith, there is a special event then it's not going to work as well. And if the user finished the on party, but it's not always the case, he's not going to play the game as well.


So I think it's important to think about your creative strategy as a team, as a lean team, with your project, your project, and as well, your ASO manager and see, oh, you can advertise on the web. That is smart enough to have something that is aligned with your game. You want to decrease the supply, but you want as well to have a great retention, to keep people in the game and to make them purchase. Otherwise you're just buying traffic and potentially even really expensive because, you know, in Google, as a retention actually can impact. So a, you definitely want to have a good deputy. I like top of the funnel, middle of the funnel and those affiliate.

Richard:
Fantastic. I love the way you think about it is the whole user journey, right? So just to kind of reiterate you to ensure that your working with the whole team, right. To make sure that things are working well, that there's no broken part of the chain.

Claire:
And I think it's really modeled the way I'm working at Gamla because I'm a, I think a gambler is actually one of the first, I mean, these like crowding team, we work really closely with project. I personally work with the unity developer and then also were a manager, but the amazing, and we have a really stronger creative strategy. I think Gamla is one of the best in class in creative, especially since tonight join because we have this approach of making the game better. We've used acquisition as well, and always sharing feedback and through a call,

Richard:
I love the way that you talk about that. So let me throw this back out there. If you were going to give advice to someone who was just getting into this, what advice would you give to someone who was looking to make either a step forward or their first foray into creative? And they were concerned about misleading

Claire:
Ads first, I totally get that. You can be concerned about shit because Facebook is really pushing for it. Like now it won't be a low that's also. So I think if you are fast enough and smart enough to make your project evolve, it's always the same, what I'm seeing, but it, one thing is hitting at the end of the day. You just need to be quick and to short tell your, your process and work pretty closely. If you want to go into the separate, I think you really need to, to, to share and to normalize the process and make sure like all teams work and share on the same basis of knowledge. I feel like really fan, you know, it's a UN manager asking artists to do, to do nice teaching ads. And at the end of the day, like they don't even explain to the product wise, they want to do this. So just sharing what is working for us, I think is a good step to show as well. But to project that is sexually like, like <inaudible> and was a day to spend the money on an ad and to see as a user feedback. And then you can really makes the game better and, and so-and-so really communicate as a team, but with all the teams, not the UN, you know, <inaudible>,

Richard:
I love that what you said then about using it almost like a UX survey, you know, this is an opportunity for you to gather that direct feedback and then implement that from the product side.

Claire:
Yes. But then he like to be honest, that I used to work for when I was a French competitor for Google maps. And I remember we did, like, we went into a <inaudible> and we met the people in Sudan and it was really long, really expensive. And now with digital marketing, you just have the opportunity to do it really fast in one day you have no user feedback. So I think it's something that smart companies are going to use more and more to make the game better and also to decrease the cost of acquisition and be always up to date of the last trend and, or they can offer a better user experience.

Richard:
Yeah. That's that's genius and a really, really good comparison as well. So listen, Claire, I know time is short, so thank you so much for your insights today.

Claire:
Thank you for having me and it was a pleasure to chat with you and anytime.